Range Rover Velar is the best driver’s car it’s ever made ?

Range Rover Velar is the best driver’s car it’s ever made ?

The desire for the SUV market has never been so lucrative and the luxury brands are stepping up to meet demand. Originally a high bred derived from a working  vehicle, basically a 4×4 and the great beast that started it all was the  Land Rover a basic utility vehicle for off road work.

Range Rover Velar is the best driver’s car it’s ever made ?

The next Encarnacion was the Range Rover in 1970 which was still very basic. The dashboard seats and the floor was made from plastic, vinyl based materials designed to washed down with a hose. They were only available as a 2 door model until 1981 although specialised companies started modding them to 4 doors well before this. As they added more luxury to the interiors the more units they sold. An original 1970 Range Rover my be worth more than a new one

Range Rover Velar is the best driver’s car it’s ever made ?

Range Rover Velar is the best driver’s car it’s ever made ?

SUV so what does it actually mean, Sports `utility vehicle. The likelihood that as a SUV owner you will need the full capability of the car is probably around 0.2%. Still the desire to own one of these over powered 4 x4 armchairs has never been greater. Jaguar have just recently launched their versions of the the luxury SUV with the F Pace and the more affordable E Pace so how will the Ranger Rover Velar stack up  against them

Land Rover says the Range Rover Velar is the best driver’s car it’s ever made, but we’ve been left underwhelmed by the variants powered by engines on the lower rungs of the range. Now, though, we’ve driven a model far better prepared to stand up to Land Rover’s opening claim: a top-spec First Edition P380 with JLR’s proven supercharged 3.0-litre V6 beneath its snout.

Available only during the car’s first year of production, the price of the First Edition starts at an eye-watering £85,450 – £15,240 more than the regular P380 – but it does so with a considerably longer list of standard-fit kit. Key among the additions is All Terrain Progress Control and £1140 worth of air suspension, as well as a head-up display, normally a £930 option. It bolsters the already high-tech armoury of cabin infotainment that’s made up of  two touchscreens and digital instrument cluster, making for the most impressive cabin in this class.

The infotainment beats even the Virtual Cockpit of Audi’s Q5 for visual drama, although it’s less intuitive to use. Its touch responsiveness is comparable to that of a smartphone but, frustratingly, the reaction time for menus to load is not quite as swift. Our Velar’s system occasionally needed up to two seconds to respond when multiple applications, such as the satnav and music player, were called into use soon after one another.

autocar.co.uk

 

The car’s V6 engine is shared with the Jaguar F-Pace S, with which the Velar also borrows its aluminium structure. The motor channels 375bhp and 332lb ft to all four wheels via an eight-speed ZF gearbox, with power biased to the rear wheels in normal driving conditions.

On-road handling is drastically boosted by the presence of adjustable air suspension, which can be set in several modes ranging from Comfort for a more forgiving damping through to Dynamic for the most composed ride. While the Velar can’t mimic the hunkered-down stance of the more sporting F-Pace S or its rival, the Porsche Macan, it still mixes good ride comfort with impressive body control. Where it loses ground to its rivals as a driver’s car is in steering. The car’s electronically assisted system is no match for the more feelsome systems of the F-Pace and Macan, but this is clearly not an area of focus for the Velar. Ease of use is.

 

read more at autocar.co.uk

Change the leather for something less obviously pimp and dump the ubiquitous privacy glass and you’ll have a decent enough “executive” car. But seriously, £85,000! When the PCP/PCH bubble pops, JLR is going to be far up it without one. Santander and Lloyds Banks may be left holding the returned cars and bad debts, but JLR will be left with the fantastical retail prices and showrooms full of unaffordable (and socially unattractive) metal.

autocar.co.uk

 

Jaguar Land Rover posts marginal sales increment in October 2017 Jaguar Land Rover posts marginal sales increment in October 2017 The company said the results reflect growing sales of the Range Rover Velar and the new Discovery model. Retail sales in October were up year-on-year in markets such as China. By: PTI | Updated: November 8, 2017 2:13 PM Tata Motors-owned Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) today reported 0.2 per cent increase in retail sales at 46,418 units in October compared to the same month last year. Jaguar retail sales were down 14.3 per cent at 12,336 vehicles in October compared to October 2016, primarily reflecting lower sales of the Jaguar XE . Jaguar Land Rover posts marginal sales increment in October 2017 – The Financial Express

autocar.co.uk

2018 Range Rover Velar P380 First Edition review Jez Spinks The Range Rover Velar is further evidence that Land Rover has no intention of being an ironic note in automotive history as a dedicated 4WD brand that missed a beat during the SUV craze. Pros and Cons Superb cabin design and materials Stunning concept-car exterior Striking twin-screen execution not just about form Smooth and precise steering Ride compromised by 22-inch wheels Not as engaging to drive as its Jaguar twin Supercharged V6 not entirely effortless, lacks character Gulps fuel in spirited driving First Edition a big price for a medium SUV While the original Range Rover existed alone for more than 30 years, the past 13 years have now seen the ‘Rangie’ line-up quadrupled with the Sport (2004), Evoque (2011), and now Velar (pronounced with emphasis on the first syllable). The latest stiff-upper-lip SUV from Britain takes its name from the prototypes that tried to put the industry off the scent that Rover (Land Rover didn’t officially exist as a brand until 1978) was developing a vehicle that was as good on road as it was off it. If there’s any sign that Land Rover is as much about design today as it is 4WD engineering, the 21st-century Velar is it. And Land Rover has its axles crossed it will prove to be as successful as the style-focused Evoque, above which the concept-car-for-the-road Velar sits to fill the pricing “white space” between the baby Rangie and the Rangie Sport. The vast range (40-odd variants) starts from $70,662 – a touch below the Jaguar F-Pace with which it shares many components and its aluminium architecture – and up to $135,762. 2018 Range Rover Velar P380 First Edition review

 

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